Jerry Hearn

Leonarto

THEATRE EXPERIENCE

Jerry has been performing in community theatre for most of his life, having started at school a very long time ago. He moved to Canberra in the early 1990s, and rates the theatre scene here as 'second to none'. Highlights from the last twenty-odd years include playing Professor Serebryakov in Uncle Vanya, Martin Dysart in Equus, Malvolio in Twelfth Night, Father in The Book of Everything, Arnold in Improbable Fiction, Henry Higgins in Pygmalion, Martin in The Goat, Pozzo in Waiting for Godot, Simon Able in Sly Fox, Mick in The Caretaker, Levene in Glengarry Glen Ross and TS Eliot in Tom and Viv.  


Jerry is incredibly grateful to the companies, producers and directors for the opportunities and roles he's been given, and he's loved the passion, creativity and community spirit of every cast he's worked with.

ON SHAKESPEARE

My favourite scripts are crunchy and chewy, with nuggetty flavour bombs waiting to surprise me every time I speak the lines. Shakespeare – he’s the crunchiest of them all.

ON SHAKESPEARE BY THE LAKES

I’ve seen performances of these classics grab people’s attention in shopping-centres, beachfronts, and parks. Canberra hasn’t seen open-air Shakespeare for decades. It’s fantastic to see it explode back to life under the stewardship of such an energetic and engaged creative team. It’s a privilege to be part of, and I fully expect this to be a feature of Canberra’s theatre calendar for years to come.

ON LEONARTO

Leonato is many roles in one. We first meet him as the genial host who welcomes the audience to the story and the setting. We get to know better as he pops in and out of the action, showing us how much he enjoys a party, a feast, and a good joke! It’s only when tragedy intervenes that we discover his passionate nature and the power of his love for family.

ON THE ROLE

Excited. Grateful. Terrified. The usual, really. Right now, I’m really up. By Production Week, I’ll be a basket case. On Opening Night, I’ll be soaring again. The Run will be ecstasy with patches of misery. Not that the audience will ever notice. But it’s probably best not to ask a neurotic creative how he feels about a show until after it closes.